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Commode chest of drawers

(France c. 1790)



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Dimensions
Width 125.00cm 49.21 inches
Height 83.00cm 32.68 inches
Depth 60.00cm 23.62 inches
Classification
Artists CLUAUDE-CHARLES SAUNIER (1735-1807)
Other Details
Price gbp 15500.00 (Pound Sterling)

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Description / Expertise

A fine quality Louis XVI satinwood marble top commode chest of drawers. Its very rare to find a satinwood commode chest as most on the open market are mahogany and are not of this quality and condition. The whole is raised on small turned feet, the marble top & brass handles are later replacements . The three long graduated oak-lined drawers are satinwood, and banded in purple-heartwood this is also known by its correct name amaranth, around the drawers and sides the article is inlaid with pewter. Turned fluted pilasters

Provenance

From a private collection in Kent

Literature:

"Born in Paris in 1735, died in 1807, Claude-Charles Saunier is one of the best Parisian cabinetmakers of Louis XVI.
The ancestor of this family of cabinet makers is one Jean Saunier, sculptor in Paris whose two son, Jean-Baptiste and Jean-Charles, worked as carpenters in the family workshop on rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine.

Jean-Charles, who will receive the Masters in 1743 as a master's son, will be a member of the guild from 1750 to 1752. His three son, Jean-Baptiste Mathieu and Claude-Charles-Charles, also work in his father's workshop. Claude-Charles will receive control in 1752 as master of son, but the record will only thirteen years later, in 1765.

His early works reflect the influence of his father and labor relations of the latter, mainly Jean-Fran├žois Oeben, Jean-Francois Leleu and Chevalier. His personality is emerging on its production of the 1760s, when it finally adopts the Louis XVI style.